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    These strips are collected by first removing the bark from trees, then special knives are used to cut the inner cambium layer which is cut to size and dried. We have managed to find a man in Vermont to produce these wonderful strips for us.

    The famous spruce band, which makes cheeses such as Mont d’Or so visually striking, is tied around the cheese when the cheese is very young, before the rind has begun to develop. The spruce cambium serves a practical function – to hold the ripening cheese together as it develops a melting, almost liquid texture, and also imparts the most striking aromas to the cheese. An aroma of rubbed pine needles, of Christmas trees, of soft-wood resin.

    As the cheese ripens and this unmistakable aroma begins to develop, a thin rind starts to form – a delicate geotrichum bloom which breaks down the firm paste of the cheese, giving a creamy texture and yeasty flavour. Fluffy white molds coat the cheese and act with the geotrichum to ripen the cheese and also give the rind an undulating or crumpled appearance.

    DIMENSIONS: Approximatally 14" Long x 1" Wide (Please note, these are hand cut, so small variations on length may occur.)

    QUANTITY: 6 Cambium Strips

    DETAILS: A thin, pliable layer between the bark and wood of a spruce tree which has been collected by hand. Strips are one time use.

    COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: United States

    RETURN INFORMATION: We are sorry but we cannot accept returns of used equipment. For our full return policy, please click here.

    LEARN: For more information on using these spruce strips click here.

    Based on 5 Reviews
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    From: Oregon

    More info needed

    It would be nice to know before purchase if product is reusable.

    It would also be good to know how to adhere product to cheese-- string , rubber bands????


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    From: Richmond, Va

    A Magic Ingredient

    <p>I reviewed these spruce cambium strips earlier when I purchased them to make a Mont D'Or style cheese (or, as I called then, a Winnemere Wannabe). That cheese convinced me to try these with another semi-soft: in this case a bit if a stinker based on Jim's Esrom procedure. These binding strips have become a magic ingredient for me!</p>

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    From: Mountains of No. CA

    The Bark AND the Bite lead to Cheese Heaven

    I have made two batches using this bark. It fits the camembert mold perfectly. The first recipe I made my own cardoon rennet and goat milk--yum. The second batch I found Jim Wallace's Mont d'Or recipe. Easy and fun! My cheeses look just like Jim's--they are so beautiful I can hardly wait! Ordering more bark now...

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    From: Winnipeg, Canada

    Great service!

    The strips showed up as promised and right quick - thanks again!



    Rob


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    From: Richmond, Va

    These are artisanal tools for great cheese!

    One of my all-time favorite cheese styles is best represented by the Autumn alpine cows-milk cheeses such as Vacherin Mont D'Or. Perhaps my very favorite cheese in this style is Winnemere from Vermont's acclaimed Jasper Hills Farm creamery. When I saw Jim Wallace's recipe/procedure for a Mont D'Or style cheese in a recent Moos Letter, I had to give it a try. And I really jumped for joy when I saw that NECS had contracted with a Vermont artisan to produce the spruce cambium strips required to provide some key flavor and aroma ingredients.



    My first batch of Mont D'Or ala Wallace has not yet ripened enough for me to taste one, but the aromas already have that spruce-woodsy/bacony touch that characterizes this style of cheese. The NECS cambium strips are very well made, exactly the right size for making small cheeses with something like a Camembert mold. I just know my Winnemere Wannabe cheese is going to be a winner. Thanks Jim, your spruce strip craftsman, and NECS!